Tag Archive | dave chesson

How to Get Your Email Subscribers to Leave Quality Reviews—Legitimately

Who doesn’t need more book reviews? No author I know of. Dave Chesson and Jordon Ring have put together a very helpful post sharing tips and 3 steps to asking for reviews and building relationships with your readers. Even though this is written for folks who have reader email list, I think some of the tips can be helpful in any interaction with a reader – email or in person.

Remember – any time you send or sell a book, politely and sincerely ask for a review. If you’re mailing it, put in a hand written request. I use colored paper to help it stand out a bit more. If I am asking in person, I look the person in the eye just before they are about to leave me and as for an online review,  letting them know how helpful it is to me. I don’t tell them where to leave the review, I just leave that up to them. My name and my book title anywhere on the web is helpful, so it really doesn’t matter.

Asking for a review will up your chances of actually getting your reader to leave one!

Thanks for the helpful post, guys!

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One of the most difficult parts of book marketing (if not the most difficult) is getting reviews for your book, particularly quality reviews that exceed one sentence. Why is this? Because each potential reviewer is a busy person with a lot on their plate, so their time is valuable. Besides, remember back when you weren’t an author?  It wasn’t evident to you how important reviews were, so you didn’t think to go out of your way to leave a review. It just sometimes…happened. So, as you can see, readers and fans need a little nudge and some simple tactics to get

Source: How to Get Your Email Subscribers to Leave Quality Reviews—Legitimately


Had to share a picture of the kids in my summer school writing and publishing class at New Glarus Elementary in Wisconsin.

ss class 2018

It was elementary and middle school grade kids who spent a week with me learning about what goes into publishing a book, some basics about writing a story and then writing their  own story.

I’m always impressed with the creativity of these kids. It’s a fun time with budding writers. Now I am in the process of putting their stories together into a book that they can s

hare with family and friends. Pretty exciting!

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Avoid the 30% Tax Withholding for Non-US Self Publishers

This is a very important post for those who live outside of the US. I had no clue! Thanks Dave and Marta!

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Reduce Amazon Tax withholdings by 30 percent and set up an ACX account if you’re a non-US authors and increase your Kindle royalties in 5 easy steps.

Source: Avoid the 30% Tax Withholding for Non-US Self Publishers

Ironclad Book Copyright Page Examples that will Protect You!

Dave Chesson gives some great information and links related to book copyright and a copyright page. – Thanks Dave for making it so clear!

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Access our free book copyright page example as well as learn how to create a book copyright page for your book so as to protect yourself.

Source: Ironclad Book Copyright Page Examples that will Protect You!

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

IngramSpark vs. Createspace: Print on Demand Battle Royal

Dave Chesson of kindlepreneur has made a very handy list of pro and cons for IngramSpark and createspace, really the only two printers/publishers I would suggest anyone use. I have used both for my clients and myself.

I would have to agree that IngramSpark is not as user friendly for those unfamiliar with the publishing process, but would also agree that their quality is more consistent.  The other thing that might throw a self-publisher is figuring out what percent discount to give the various distribution options that IngramSpark has. They say the standard is 55%, which is similar to selling a print book on Amazon. (I’m not sure the % createspace takes for its various distribution outlets, but I can’t imagine it’s different. If anyone out there knows, I’d love to hear!)

I have one book with IngramS at the moment (Will the Real Carolyn Keene Please Stand Up) and went with 50% vs 55% for US sales (less for international because of the cost) and I still get sales. I went with IS for this book because I wanted a hardcover and createspace doesn’t do hardcover (though I know some have managed it through them somehow). I also have a soft cover of the same book through them. Plus I wanted to see how my sales were on IS vs the couple books I have printed through createspace.

So far, I sell more print books through IS than createspace, but I’m not comparing apples to apples since they are different books and may interest different people (though they are both historical fiction books). And just so you know, IS distributes for Amazon, so any Amazon orders I get for a print book will be fulfilled by IS. And IS only has certain sizes for hardcover. My Carolyn Keene book is 5.5″ X 8.5″ which they do. My most recent MG book (Intrigue in Istanbul: An Agnes Kelly Mystery Adventure) is 7.75″ x 5.25″ which they don’t do, so I went with a local printer (Publisher Graphics) for that and they did a wonderful job. Now I have to decide if I want to do a soft cover with IS so I can get a wider distribution network or see if I can convince them do something custom for me. They have many size options for soft cover. And their shipping costs to me are less than createspace, but maybe that depends on where you live (I live in Wisconsin).

One more FYI. You can not use both companies. If you want to try IS and you currently have your book printed through createspace, you will have to take it off createspace before IS will print/distribute it for you.

If you have any other questions about either publisher, don’t hesitate to contact me. I’d be happy to help out.

Source: IngramSpark vs. Createspace: Print on Demand Battle Royal

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

The Importance of Keywords to Ranking Your Book on Amazon – The Book Designer

Dave Chesson is guest posting on the Book Designer and he has some good reminders about keyword use on Amazon.

If you haven’t checked your key words since you first put up your book, it might be good to give them a second look 🙂

Source: The Importance of Keywords to Ranking Your Book on Amazon – The Book Designer

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality