Tag Archive | book marketing

How to Write An Author Bio 

I don’t remember ever reading anything about writing your author bio, so I clicked on this when I saw it. Sandra Beckwith give us some dos and don’ts.

There is also a link to another post about avoiding 4 bio mistakes.

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“You know that you need an author bio for your book cover and online retail sales pages, but did you realize that you need one in your author press kit, too?…”

Source: How to write an author bio – Build Book Buzz

5 Easy Steps to a Successful Media Appearance

The opportunity to talk on the radio, on a podcast or even on TV may not come up very often, but you want to be ready when that opportunity does arrive. A.G. Billig gives us 5 good items to consider.

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Getting ready for a podcast, radio, TV, or summit appearance? Here’s how to make sure you have a successful media appearance.

Source: 5 easy steps to a successful media appearance – Build Book Buzz

6 (7) Ways You Are Destroying Your Chances of Finding Readers 

Laurence O’Bryan of BooksGoSocial makes some very good points about how to find readers.

And as he says, it’s a long haul game. It takes time and effort to do these things, but they are all doable. Make a “to do” list and slowly work your way through it, making sure you acknowledge your accomplishments along the way. It’s a learning experience, so don’t expect perfection. Miss-steps are part of the process (especially if writing and publishing is a new “game” for you), but you can decrease some of that by checking out Laurence’s list.

And I’d add one more way:
-7)  Not connecting with other writers.
So much can be learned and eased on this journey by connecting with other writers. There are lots of online writer’s groups out there (SCBWI, ALLI are just two examples) which can give you loads of help, information, and connection. And when writer’s conferences are again a thing – and they will be! – they are a great place to connect locally, in addition to a fun way to learn ways to up your writing game.

(Note: I can not give a thumbs up or down for the services mentioned in the post, but I have used their Netgalley services with good results.)

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Source: 6 Ways You Are Destroying Your Chances of Finding Readers |

CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

How To Get Libraries To Buy Your Book

Rebecca Langley lays out a specific list of to-do tasks to try and get your book into libraries. It’s not for the marketing faint of heart, but if you can get in, libraries are all over this country.

Getting into your local library is probably easier than what she describes. Knowing your librarians and finding out what they might be looking for for their patrons is helpful. Just ask. Rebecca is right, it’s all about getting patrons in the door.

She doesn’t mention audio books. Having your book as an audio book is also another plus. Findaway voices is a new service that puts your audio book on multiple formats (including audible).

And look at that list of reviewers (Library Journal, Kirkus, PW, Booklist…) early in your writing process. Many free reviews require the book 3 months before publication. You can send them an ARC (advanced reader copy), so that is helpful. But you’ll have to plan ahead. I know once your book is done, you really want to get it out, but getting your book reviewed by a few of these companies can go a long way in selling more books. I know I wish I had done this for a couple of my books.

And speaking of reviews, you’ll want a decent number (10-20+?) of reviews on Amazon before you do any marketing. Librarians look at Amazon too.

Best of luck!

Stay safe!
Christine

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Library books have a longer shelf life than in bookstores, and they get more action, because there’s no financial risk for the inquisitive reader.

Source: How To Get Libraries To Buy Your Book

CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

55 Social Media Hashtags For Book Authors (And How To Use Them) 

Are you confused by hashtages like I am?

The staff at Web Design Relief put this handy list together so you don’t have to be confused about what hashtag to use to connect with more readers or other authors.

Plus they give us guidelines for using hashtags: (thank you!!)

  • Use hashtags specific to your message (examples in the post)
  • Try to take advantage of the important keywords in your post’s text (examples in the post)
  • Or, add hashtags at the end of the post
  • Don’t use too many hashtags (1-2), except on Instagram, where it doesn’t seem to matter

Below is the link to the post.

Thanks Web Design Relief staff!

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Writers: Boost engagement on social media by harnessing the power of writing and publishing hashtags.

Source: 55 Social Media Hashtags For Book Authors (And How To Use Them) | Web Design Relief

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Smashwords Two New Marketing Tools

Smashwords today unveiled Smashwords Presales, a new book launch tool that will thrill your readers.

Smashwords Presales leverages patent-pending technology to enable the creation, management and merchandising of ebook presales.  An ebook presale allows readers to purchase and read a new book before the public release date.

Presales are different than preorders.

Click on the link below to find out the details. Mark also talks about a new Smashwords feature: Global Coupons. Basically, it allows you to create a coupon on multiple titles at once, if I’m understanding it correctly. Not exactly sure how that is a significant help, but I’ll have to think on it a bit more.

Source: Smashwords

Do I Need a Platform and If So, How High?

Anne Greenwood Brown talks about platforms for authors. She showcases a fiction author who’s book has in interesting premise – celebery crushes.

Notice she says getting a following can take years. I think she’s right, for most of us authors, so patience and persistance is a must, whether you’re going the traditional route or self-publishing.

Have a read…

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In 2010, when I first dipped my toe into the publishing world, the biggest mystery to me was—besides figuring out the difference between a query and a synopsis—this thing called a “platform.” At th…

Source: Do I Need a Platform and If So, How High?

Top 10 FAQs About Book Publicity and Promotion 

Some good information about promotion by Joan Stewart. I particularly like the list of free press release distribution services. I have not tried any of these but will definitely look into them.

Joan also lists a couple paid services that she prefers, though one would have to wonder if she says The main reason you’re publishing your press release isn’t so media reprint it. Few if any will. You’re publishing it so it pulls traffic to your website and serves as collateral material for a well-written, customized pitch to a journalist, reviewer, influencer or someone else who can help you, I’m not sure that would be money well spent. I would think the free services would suffice. But what do I know about this? Nothing, really.

Anyone else know about these PR services?

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The number one question authors ask? “How long do I have to market my book?” Here are the most frequently asked questions I hear about book publicity…

Source: Top 10 FAQs About Book Publicity and Promotion – The Book Designer

Lessons From BuzzFeed on How to Grow and Engage Your Audience

Dan Blank (WeGrowMedia) talks about growing your audience, as a author, with Ze (Zay) Frank of Buzzfeed.

Image result for buzzfeed logo

As with many things Dan talks about, it seems to be a matter of connecting and “collaboration” on a personal level with people. I think you can use that word “collaboration” in a few different ways. But I took it more as connecting.

And the fact that Ze says with some of his more viral posts, he doesn’t really know why they went viral, says a lot too.

Dan even says: But for the 1,000 other things you do to try to develop an audience for your work — articles, events, interviews, blogs, newsletters, social media — don’t assume you know what will work. Experiment and allow others to help you learn what does and doesn’t work to engage them.

That means trying a lot of different things. What I have found is things I do in person, work the best and sometimes lead to things I can’t predict (as I mentioned in this post I did on marketing).

Another point they make is you can’t be in one place (online or in person) and expect to reach a lot of people.

Ze says that only 15-17% of views of Buzzfeed content comes from Buzzfeed’s website and the same percent from their other channels: emails, social media… I think that is amazing! A big company like that and that’s how many people come to their site or visit their social media and share their content?!

What does this mean? Same thing, really. You can’t put up a website and decide that is good enough. You need to be in a lot of different places. And some (most?) of the sharing, of course, you have no control over.

Here is the whole post, if you want to read it.

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Source: Lessons From BuzzFeed on How to Grow and Engage Your Audience – WeGrowMedia – Dan Blank

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Reader’s Favorite Award Deadline Soon

Spring is the time to enter book award contests.

There are a limited number of big-name books awards available to self-published authors. Reader’s Favorite is one of them.

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Jim Carrey Gold Medal

Jim Carrey

The regular deadline for this year is May 1, so you’ve got time yet to sign up. If you’re not quite ready, June 1 is the drop dead deadline, which will cost you more, of course.

I have entered this contest a couple different times. Have not won yet, but earned a very nice 5 star review. You can also request more than one review, whether you win or not.

The cost is $109 now or $119 on June 1.  They have 140+ genres. You get a chance to get a traditional publishing contract, win money, be represented by a marketing and PR firm, and have your book made into a movie. And of course the publicity would be wonderful with such a large, international award.

I also recommend the IPPY Award, The Brag Award  (adult and children’s books), the Moombean Children’s Award (for children’s stories, obviously),

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Eriq La Salle

Eriq LaSalle – Actor/Director

Happy Spring!

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CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality