Tag Archive | createspace

Bye, Bye Createspace, Hello KDP Print

Image result for kdp print logo

image from ryanmwilliams.com

The rumors are no longer rumors. Createspace is shutting down and moving all it’s titles – your titles, perhaps – to KDP Print.

When is this happening? “in a few weeks.”

Can I move my books to KDP Books sooner? Yes you can, at this link: https://kdp.amazon.com/createspace-transfer. Or so they say, in theory. I tried today and it didn’t work. It opened my account (Step 1), It verified my titles (Step 2), but a no go on the ‘Start the move’ (Step 3). I’m guess they are inundated with people trying to move their books.

Don’t worry. They’ll move your books for you eventually. Maybe I’ll just let them do it.

If you have other questions, you can go to this CS to KDP FAQ page and probably get an answer.

Here’s another link to a post by Amy Collins on The Book Designer site.

Best of luck!
Christine Keleny

CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Amazon is Cutting Services For Authors

Prime Day dents sales at smaller retailers, local firm finds (copy) (copy) (copy)

I don’t know if you’ve heard, but Amazon is cutting it’s editing, design and marketing services.

“After a thorough review of our service offerings, we’ve made the decision to discontinue Createspace’s paid professional editing, design and marketing services,” Amazon said in a statement. “We will work closely with impacted employees through this transition to help them find new roles within the company or assist them with pursuing opportunities outside the company.”

Here is a post by Thad Moore on The Post and Courior.

But never fear!!

There are many people out there like me, who work on a freelance basis and can help you edit and design and market your story. I’ve been a member and the Southcentral Wisconsin Chapter Coordinator of the Editoral Freelancers Association for many years now and they are a great group of professionals from across the US (and I think a few in other countries as well) that aim to provide quality services and have the authors interest at heart.

If you need any kind of editing, design or marketing services, walk, don’t run –

to their site and submit a job listing. You’ll get more responses then you’ll know what to do with. And I may just be one of them 😉  Or just contact me directly at christinekeleny@yahoo.com for a quote.

my-image1CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

 

Book Distribution For Self-Published Authors Beyond Createspace & Kindle 

I agree with Steven Spatz in this post – putting books (ebook or print) is a must for Amazon, but don’t stop there. The other company that has made it very doable is IngramSpark. They are not as user friendly or free (as compared to Amazon), but their distribution options, known name and quality of product make it worth the small investment and time needed to set your book(s) there as well. Though I would not use IngramS. for your ebook – there are many more and less expensive options – my favorite being Smashwords, since they put you ebook on ibooks, B&N, Kobo, library distributors and more.

The #1 mistake made by self-published authors! Here is a list of book distributors for worldwide book sales in addition to Amazon and Amazon Kindle.

Source: Book Distribution For Self-Published Authors Beyond Amazon & Kindle | BookBaby Blog

KDP Print – Amazon is Beta-Testing a Combined Kindle and POD Dashboard 

 

kdp-00-logo-614x256Here’s some interesting news from Nate Hoffelder for those authors who have just electronic versions of their books. This is a wonderful service for authors to get their print books done as well.

But once this becomes a thing – remember that Amazon charges 60% for expanded distribution of print books.

I recommend to all my clients that they sell print books through Amazon, opt out of Amazon’s expanded distribution, and use IngramSpark for expanded distribution, which has wider distribution around the world (including libraries) and you get to choose what % the retailer gets (though keep in mind – 40% is standard for retailers and Ingram takes 15% so the standard is 55%). They also print better quality books (ones that you might order for yourself to sell or give as gifts.)

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For the longest time Amazon has offered two distribution platforms for books. Publishers could use KDP to sell ebooks in the Kindle Store, and they could use Createspace (and before that, Booksurge) to distribute POD books. Now Amazon is testing a combined interface where publishers can manage both their ebooks in the Kindle Store and their POD books in Createspace. The new feature is called KDP Print, and according to the comment thread at KBoards this feature has been available to a limited number of KDP users since July 2016.  […]

Source: KDP Print – Amazon is Beta-Testing a Combined Kindle and POD Dashboard | The Digital Reader

my imageCKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Self-Publishing Tip: Why you need IngramSpark AND CreateSpace 

imagesI recently discovered this little secret and I wanted to share it with you, in case you didn’t know. If you are self-publishing your book(s), it is in your best interest to publish both with Createspace for the Amazon sales, and with IngramSpark for other sales. This is because of Ingram’s large distribution network and their reputation with bookstores and libraries around the globe.

This post will give you all the reasons why.

Source: Why you need IngramSpark AND CreateSpace – UPDATED | New Shelves Books

my-image1CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

IngramSpark vs. Createspace: Print on Demand Battle Royal

Dave Chesson of kindlepreneur has made a very handy list of pro and cons for IngramSpark and createspace, really the only two printers/publishers I would suggest anyone use. I have used both for my clients and myself.

I would have to agree that IngramSpark is not as user friendly for those unfamiliar with the publishing process, but would also agree that their quality is more consistent.  The other thing that might throw a self-publisher is figuring out what percent discount to give the various distribution options that IngramSpark has. They say the standard is 55%, which is similar to selling a print book on Amazon. (I’m not sure the % createspace takes for its various distribution outlets, but I can’t imagine it’s different. If anyone out there knows, I’d love to hear!)

I have one book with IngramS at the moment (Will the Real Carolyn Keene Please Stand Up) and went with 50% vs 55% for US sales (less for international because of the cost) and I still get sales. I went with IS for this book because I wanted a hardcover and createspace doesn’t do hardcover (though I know some have managed it through them somehow). I also have a soft cover of the same book through them. Plus I wanted to see how my sales were on IS vs the couple books I have printed through createspace.

So far, I sell more print books through IS than createspace, but I’m not comparing apples to apples since they are different books and may interest different people (though they are both historical fiction books). And just so you know, IS distributes for Amazon, so any Amazon orders I get for a print book will be fulfilled by IS. And IS only has certain sizes for hardcover. My Carolyn Keene book is 5.5″ X 8.5″ which they do. My most recent MG book (Intrigue in Istanbul: An Agnes Kelly Mystery Adventure) is 7.75″ x 5.25″ which they don’t do, so I went with a local printer (Publisher Graphics) for that and they did a wonderful job. Now I have to decide if I want to do a soft cover with IS so I can get a wider distribution network or see if I can convince them do something custom for me. They have many size options for soft cover. And their shipping costs to me are less than createspace, but maybe that depends on where you live (I live in Wisconsin).

One more FYI. You can not use both companies. If you want to try IS and you currently have your book printed through createspace, you will have to take it off createspace before IS will print/distribute it for you.

If you have any other questions about either publisher, don’t hesitate to contact me. I’d be happy to help out.

Source: IngramSpark vs. Createspace: Print on Demand Battle Royal

my-image1CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Publishing a Paperback with IngramSpark

Abigail Carter – of Writer.ly – has shared some very helpful information for publishing with IngramSpark/LighteningSource.

I have published through createspace/Amazon, have had my books published with a brick and mortar printer in my area and plan on using Ingram/LighteningSource (same company) to get on their distribution list. I wonder if she started with Lightening Sources if it would have been any easier. I think I remember reading that somewhere but I’m not sure about that.

Abigail shares some insights that will make the process easier. Ingram has a long way to go to make the process as easy as Amazon does.

When I try it and if I find out any other helpful tips, I’ll let you-all know!

Publishing a Paperback with IngramSpark – Writer.ly Community.