The Pros and Cons of Independent Publishing: Part One | Valerie Biel

Valerie Biel of Lost Lake Press, lays out the good and the bad of both traditional and indie publishing in a clear, easy to understand way. If you’ve ever questioned why to do one or the other, take a look at this post.

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Welcome to a three-part series on the pros and cons of independent or self publishing. This is going to be an honest discussion about what you need to consider before deciding which route is best for your publishing goals and skill set. First, we’ll look at overall concerns within the positives and negatives of each type of publishing. Part two will dive into potential earnings and royalties along with the business concerns you must address for successful independent publishing.

Source: The Pros and Cons of Independent Publishing: Part One | Valerie Biel

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Peer Critique Versus Professional Editing: When, Why and How to Use Both | Jane Friedman

Jane Friedman has answered some typical questions about who and when to have people read your manuscript before publishing.

I always encourage a writer, before they hand a manuscript off to anyone, to print out the piece on paper (or look at it on a different device e.g. a tablet vs a computer screen – it’s not quite a good as looking at it on paper but it does help make it appear different to your brain). Once you’ve got it on paper, read it out loud. These two things can greatly help you self-edit before you ask others to take their time to read your piece.

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Developmental editors, critique partners, sensitivity readers, friends—feedback comes from different people, for different reasons, at different times.

Source: Peer Critique Versus Professional Editing: When, Why and How to Use Both | Jane Friedman

What Amazon’s Slowing of Book Deliveries Means For Authors 

The current, though admittedly, very abnormal situation illustrates how having your book as an ebook, as well as print, is a good idea.

Let’s be honest. No one ever HAD to have that book they ordered next day delivered. Frankly, even before this pandemic, I thought Amazon should give the Prime buyer the option of not shipping something next day. It would help all those overworked delivery services. And those who have the ability (car, health, money), once this thing is over, shouldn’t we be going to stores and buying our books if we can? You know, support your local bookstore, maybe even a local author!

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Amazon has announced via Seller Central that they will be slowing book delivery to prioritize medical and food delivery in the US and EU. What does that mean for authors and book sales during the COVID-19 crisis?

Source: What Amazon’s Slowing of Book Deliveries Means For Authors | Self-Publishing Review

The Biggest Mistake New Authors Make

Great post by Anne R. Allen about common mistakes, misconceptions with writing that first book.

I like how she specifically address the problematic examples she gives and offers some solutions to the quandary of that first book.

I disagree, however, that you shouldn’t try and pitch that first book. Why not pitch it? You learn a lot by doing this. But… at the same time, work on that second book for sure, and the third. Build that viewership via a blog or some other social media presence. Join writer’s groups, critique groups. Go to writing conferences… Go ahead and self-publish, if you want. If the agent you eventually find doesn’t want your first book, then maybe they’ll want the second or third one.

Publishing is a business so you need to learn the business. And connecting with other writers can help in so many ways.

Novelists and memoirists have a lot in common, including the mistakes they tend to make. Don’t make this one when you’re starting out.

Source: The Biggest Mistake New Novelists and Memoirists Make

55 Social Media Hashtags For Book Authors (And How To Use Them) 

Are you confused by hashtages like I am?

The staff at Web Design Relief put this handy list together so you don’t have to be confused about what hashtag to use to connect with more readers or other authors.

Plus they give us guidelines for using hashtags: (thank you!!)

  • Use hashtags specific to your message (examples in the post)
  • Try to take advantage of the important keywords in your post’s text (examples in the post)
  • Or, add hashtags at the end of the post
  • Don’t use too many hashtags (1-2), except on Instagram, where it doesn’t seem to matter

Below is the link to the post.

Thanks Web Design Relief staff!

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Writers: Boost engagement on social media by harnessing the power of writing and publishing hashtags.

Source: 55 Social Media Hashtags For Book Authors (And How To Use Them) | Web Design Relief

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

How to Copyright a Book 

I’m sure I’ve shared posts on copyright before, but it’s always good to have a refresher. It’s quite easy to get an official copyright for anything you publish and even though it doesn’t help someone from taking your work electronically, it’s an inexpensive safeguard ($55 for electronic submission) if you every need to enter the court system. And Dave gives some examples of text used on a copyright page for those indie publisher out there!

Thanks Dave and Lawyer Steve!

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Learn from a lawyer how you can legally copyright a book, with examples and a easy step-by-step process to help protect your book’s rights.

Source: How to Copyright a Book (Written by a Lawyer) [2019] – Written by a Laywer

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

An Interview with Author/Illustrator Jessixa Bagley

Great piece on writing and illustrating but it’s not just for someone who is doing both. Authors of children’s books need to think about (and leave room for, as Jessica mentions) for the illustrator to do their thing. I love working with illustrators. They always, always surprise me!

SCBWI Wisconsin | Blog

The SCBWI-WI Fall Retreat, Let’s Get Crafty, is just a few weeks away. Although it’s sold-out, we’re so grateful that each member of the amazing faculty has answered a few questions for our blog. 

Jessixa Bagley is a children’s book author/illustrator. Her love of books and storytelling are inspired by classic storybooks and her childhood experiences in the Pacific Northwest. Jessixa has traveled both domestically and internationally for school visits, keynotes, and workshops to speak about her books. Her first picture book, Boats for Papa, has won numerous awards including the 2016 Washington State Scandiuzzi Children’s Book Award. Her picture book, Laundry Day, is the winner of a 2018 Ezra Jack Keats Honor Award for Writing. She lives in Seattle with her husband and son. Follow her on twitter: @jessixabagley

Jessixa-Bagley_bio-216x300-1.pngYour presentation is Both Sides of the Picture Book. Can you give us a sneak preview?…

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