The Down Side of Signing a Book Contract 

I agree with this writer, we spend a lot of time talking about how to get published and not enough time about what to do after you sign a contract with a book publisher.

This author got into hot water thinking she had made it; she signed with one of the big 5 publishers and then another publisher. She got a nice, big advance and was working hard on her craft. What is so bad about that? I’d be excited too. I’d have thought I’d made it too! But she tells us what happened next.

Source: How To Lose A Third Of A Million Dollars Without Really Trying

Are these reasons to avoid traditional publishing. Mostly, I’d say no. But it does help you understand how the traditional book world works, and if you end up signing a contract that is associated with an any kind of an advance, you need to know what to expect and not expect from that publisher or agent going forward.

The decision to pursue self-publishing over traditional publish still is mostly about your goals, your time, and your budget. But it is good to know what you’re getting into when you sign the dotted line!

Stay Away From Traditional Book Publishing?

Image result for authors signing books images

Dean Wesley Smith really doesn’t like traditional publishing (see link below). I’m not as dead set against it as Dean. I think it might be right for certain people – not for me, mind you – most of the time.

I have tried to find an agent for my middle grade novel series (my Agnes Kelly Mystery Adventures) to try and traditionally publish, to get greater access to the school market. But it has gotten into 3 schools anyway, through people I know who are middle grade teachers and one teacher who found me at a book sale and really liked my book. So it is still possible to get into schools, but it’s not easy.

In general, however, I find I like the creative control – of the writing, of the cover, of the interior design (which is why I help others with these tasks as well 🙂 )- and I like the control of when it gets out there and how much I am selling it for (besides a significant royalty over traditional publishing). Of course, that means me taking on the risks – paying for editing, taking the time to find out what the process is and how best to do it, keeping abreast of the book business…

Since most of the time with a traditional publisher you have to do most of the marketing anyway, why give them rights and lose the control, and wait and wait for the book to come out and make changes to it that you may or may not agree with and… Well, you get the point.

But for some who don’t have any interest in the process, can be patient, and don’t want to put any money into the game, or want to get to a difficult market – such as my example of getting into schools – it might be the way to go.

The point is to know what you’re getting into with either direction.

—————————–

Source: Stay Away From Traditional Book Publishing

 Trouble at Dog Ear Publishing

Dog ear Publishing used to be an okay publisher to use. Doesn’t look like that is the case any longer. So author beware!

———————-

Writer Beware shines a bright light into the dark corners of the shadow-world of scams, schemes, and pitfalls that prey on authors.

Source: Writer Beware®: The Blog: Alert: Trouble at Dog Ear Publishing

Writing Advice: Zen in the Art of Writing – Ray Bradbury -Part 1.

I had no idea Ray Bradbury was still alive, let alone that he wrote a book on writing. It is not on my list. Thanks Tea and Biscut!

‘Fahrenheit 451’ by Ray Bradbury is a classic book that you always find on those ‘100 books to read before you die’ lists. It’s a book that everyone has heard of and y…

Source: Writing Advice: Zen in the Art of Writing – Ray Bradbury -Part 1. – A Cup Of Tea And A Biscuit

Advertising Your Books – Part Two: Facebook Ads | Valerie Biel

Valerie Biel has given authors a wonderful step by step process for setting up a Facebook ad, in addition to tips on how to monitor that ad and make sure it is working for you.

I particularly like the advice on setting up a universal purchase link for your other books in the back of your ebook. Great idea. And BTW draft2digital lets you use their universal link creator even if you don’t publish through them. They have another company: Book2read that allows you to create this universal link for free. How nice is that! (And still I wonder, what is the catch? The pragmatist in me says nothing is for free. But maybe there isn’t a catch. I’ll use it and let you know.)

Amazon also has a linking service that will direct buyers to the correct Amazon “store” for them (US, UK, Japan, France…). Their service is booklinkerI’m going to use this one too!

It’s been a while since I’ve done a Facebook ad, so I’m sure I’ll use this post to help me when I try it again.

Thanks Val!

If you click on her post for her bookbub ad, you’ll notice, Valerie compared the various ad’s she created for her bookbub ad. Lawrence O’Bryan also talks about comparing ads plus other things that we can compare. Take a look at his post about A/B testing.

—————————

Advertising Your Books – Part One taught you how to get started with BookBub ads. I’ve continued my ad testing on that platform and have updated that article with more notes on my results HERE. The article below details how to advertise on Facebook.

Source: Advertising Your Books – Part Two: Facebook Ads | Valerie Biel

20190424_143746CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dream Become Reality

(This is the picture I used for my just released “All is Revealed in Russia” – the final book in the Agnes Kelly Mystery Adventure Series. front cover - AIRIR Don’t I look lovely! – And mysterious!)

Top 10 FAQs About Book Publicity and Promotion 

Some good information about promotion by Joan Stewart. I particularly like the list of free press release distribution services. I have not tried any of these but will definitely look into them.

Joan also lists a couple paid services that she prefers, though one would have to wonder if she says The main reason you’re publishing your press release isn’t so media reprint it. Few if any will. You’re publishing it so it pulls traffic to your website and serves as collateral material for a well-written, customized pitch to a journalist, reviewer, influencer or someone else who can help you, I’m not sure that would be money well spent. I would think the free services would suffice. But what do I know about this? Nothing, really.

Anyone else know about these PR services?

———————–

The number one question authors ask? “How long do I have to market my book?” Here are the most frequently asked questions I hear about book publicity…

Source: Top 10 FAQs About Book Publicity and Promotion – The Book Designer

Authors can now give out Nook coupon codes 

Since we’ve been talking about B&N, I thought I’d pass on this bit of good information.

———————————

Barnes & Noble Press is now making Nook ebook coupon codes available

Source: Authors can now give out Nook coupon codes | For Authors | The Fussy Librarian