Advertising Your Books – Part Two: Facebook Ads | Valerie Biel

Valerie Biel has given authors a wonderful step by step process for setting up a Facebook ad, in addition to tips on how to monitor that ad and make sure it is working for you.

I particularly like the advice on setting up a universal purchase link for your other books in the back of your ebook. Great idea. And BTW draft2digital lets you use their universal link creator even if you don’t publish through them. They have another company: Book2read that allows you to create this universal link for free. How nice is that! (And still I wonder, what is the catch? The pragmatist in me says nothing is for free. But maybe there isn’t a catch. I’ll use it and let you know.)

Amazon also has a linking service that will direct buyers to the correct Amazon “store” for them (US, UK, Japan, France…). Their service is booklinkerI’m going to use this one too!

It’s been a while since I’ve done a Facebook ad, so I’m sure I’ll use this post to help me when I try it again.

Thanks Val!

If you click on her post for her bookbub ad, you’ll notice, Valerie compared the various ad’s she created for her bookbub ad. Lawrence O’Bryan also talks about comparing ads plus other things that we can compare. Take a look at his post about A/B testing.

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Advertising Your Books – Part One taught you how to get started with BookBub ads. I’ve continued my ad testing on that platform and have updated that article with more notes on my results HERE. The article below details how to advertise on Facebook.

Source: Advertising Your Books – Part Two: Facebook Ads | Valerie Biel

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Where Publishing Dream Become Reality

(This is the picture I used for my just released “All is Revealed in Russia” – the final book in the Agnes Kelly Mystery Adventure Series. front cover - AIRIR Don’t I look lovely! – And mysterious!)

Top 10 FAQs About Book Publicity and Promotion 

Some good information about promotion by Joan Stewart. I particularly like the list of free press release distribution services. I have not tried any of these but will definitely look into them.

Joan also lists a couple paid services that she prefers, though one would have to wonder if she says The main reason you’re publishing your press release isn’t so media reprint it. Few if any will. You’re publishing it so it pulls traffic to your website and serves as collateral material for a well-written, customized pitch to a journalist, reviewer, influencer or someone else who can help you, I’m not sure that would be money well spent. I would think the free services would suffice. But what do I know about this? Nothing, really.

Anyone else know about these PR services?

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The number one question authors ask? “How long do I have to market my book?” Here are the most frequently asked questions I hear about book publicity…

Source: Top 10 FAQs About Book Publicity and Promotion – The Book Designer

Authors can now give out Nook coupon codes 

Since we’ve been talking about B&N, I thought I’d pass on this bit of good information.

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Barnes & Noble Press is now making Nook ebook coupon codes available

Source: Authors can now give out Nook coupon codes | For Authors | The Fussy Librarian

Elliott to buy Barnes & Noble; Daunt will run both chains 

Image result for barnes and noble logo

“In a seismic shift for the book trade, Elliott Advisors (UK) Limited have entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Barnes & Noble in an all-cash transaction valued at approximately $683m (£537m), including the assumption of debt….”

I wonder what this will mean for us authors?What do you think?

Source: Elliott to buy Barnes & Noble; Daunt will run both chains | The Bookseller

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16 Military Phrases and Cliches That Screenwriters/Book writers Need to Stop Using 

Ken Miyamoto knows screenplays so you can be sure he knows what he’s talking about related to his post on writing military cliches. Even though he’s talking about writing for film (or TV), the same would go for fiction.

So if you write military based fiction, take a gander at Ken’s post.

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Ken Miyamoto lists military phrases and cliches that screenwriters should avoid to create a more authentic military-driven screenplay.

Source: 16 Military Phrases and Cliches That Screenwriters Need to Stop Using – ScreenCraft

Forging Sentence Ties That Bind – Editing Fun (?)

This is one of the books that I use when I have a grammar or punctuation questions. You’d think grammar and punctuation are straightforward, but they are not.

Another great book I would recommend is “Woe Is I” by Patricia T. O’Conner. It’s easy to use and has great information.

If you want a good laugh (yes, grammar and punctuation can be funny), read “Eats, Shoots and Leaves” by Lynne Truss

And for good online assistance, the Purdue OWL is the best!

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Strong writing—writing that moves, directs, and connects people—conveys thoughts and ideas with clarity and efficiency. Badly placed words create vagueness and…

Source: Forging Sentence Ties That Bind – Grammar and Punctuation

4 Challenges of Writing for a Modern Audience and How to Overcome Them (or at least try!)

Very good post by K.M. Wieland. Not only does she note the 4 challenges, she gives you ideas on how to overcome them (or at least try to :))

It’s a no-brainer to put out the best story you can but I also agree that reading good writing is important. And for me, watching good films is also very helpful. I always get good ideas from good films.

Give it a read!

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Modern authors writing for a modern audience must be aware of four unique challenges to connecting with current readers and viewers.

Source: 4 Challenges of Writing for a Modern Audience – Helping Writers Become Authors

my imageChristine Keleny
CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality