Archives

Submissions | Midwest Review

Do you have a short piece of fiction or non-fiction (up to 6,500 words), poetry (1-5 poems) or black and white photography (1-5 images) that “examines, interprets, and redefines the full spectrum of life, past and present, in the Midwest” then the new Midwest Review writing contest might be for you. Entry fee is a tolerable $15, with a $500 cash price in each category possible and publication in Midwest Review.

Deadline is December 1.

Thought you might like to know.

Happy Turkey Day!

Wishing you many blessing to be thankful for
(including having fun dancing with your bird :))

10b40f1c43b5e63917451c80852e82ee

 

——————————–

Midwest Review seeks writing and visual art that examines, interprets, and redefines the full spectrum of life, past and present, in the Midwest.

Source: Submissions | Midwest Review

NetGalley Test – Book Reviews

So I’m dipping my big toe in the NetGalley waters.

NetGalley

What is NetGalley?

This is what they say on their website:

NetGalley is an innovative and easy-to-use online service and connection point for book publishers, reviewers, media, librarians, booksellers, bloggers and educators.

NetGalley delivers digital galleys, often called advance reading copies, or ARCs, to professional readers and helps promote new and upcoming titles. Professional readers–reviewers, media, journalists, bloggers, librarians, booksellers and educators–can join and use NetGalley at no cost.

Their description says they take ARCs, but they accept already published books as well. I’m putting my book “Will the Real Carolyn Keene Please Stand Up” on their site – see the Netgalley page here.

Here is another post I ran about NetGalley in 2017. The link is probably still worth reading but I don’t know if the cost figures would still be accurate for today.

I am using NetGalley through BooksgoSocial (BGS). They currently charge $74 for putting your book in NetGalley for a month, $139 for 2 months and $199 for 3 months. I got a cheaper deal so watch their site for the occasional deal.

Here is a link to a youtube video of BGS telling you what NetGalley is all about.

After a month, BGS will send me the reviews. I’ll let you know how it goes and if the reviews seem to translate into sales.

CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

How to Get Your Email Subscribers to Leave Quality Reviews—Legitimately

Who doesn’t need more book reviews? No author I know of. Dave Chesson and Jordon Ring have put together a very helpful post sharing tips and 3 steps to asking for reviews and building relationships with your readers. Even though this is written for folks who have reader email list, I think some of the tips can be helpful in any interaction with a reader – email or in person.

Remember – any time you send or sell a book, politely and sincerely ask for a review. If you’re mailing it, put in a hand written request. I use colored paper to help it stand out a bit more. If I am asking in person, I look the person in the eye just before they are about to leave me and as for an online review,  letting them know how helpful it is to me. I don’t tell them where to leave the review, I just leave that up to them. My name and my book title anywhere on the web is helpful, so it really doesn’t matter.

Asking for a review will up your chances of actually getting your reader to leave one!

Thanks for the helpful post, guys!

————————————

One of the most difficult parts of book marketing (if not the most difficult) is getting reviews for your book, particularly quality reviews that exceed one sentence. Why is this? Because each potential reviewer is a busy person with a lot on their plate, so their time is valuable. Besides, remember back when you weren’t an author?  It wasn’t evident to you how important reviews were, so you didn’t think to go out of your way to leave a review. It just sometimes…happened. So, as you can see, readers and fans need a little nudge and some simple tactics to get

Source: How to Get Your Email Subscribers to Leave Quality Reviews—Legitimately


Had to share a picture of the kids in my summer school writing and publishing class at New Glarus Elementary in Wisconsin.

ss class 2018

It was elementary and middle school grade kids who spent a week with me learning about what goes into publishing a book, some basics about writing a story and then writing their  own story.

I’m always impressed with the creativity of these kids. It’s a fun time with budding writers. Now I am in the process of putting their stories together into a book that they can s

hare with family and friends. Pretty exciting!

my imageCKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

10 Tips on Amazon Ads for Authors

Image result for keep on keeping on image

Laurence O’Bryan’s of Books Go Social post on Amazon ads has some helpful information. Most notably the link to kindlepreneur and a free book description tool. A good book description is very important!

Laurence mentions that it’s important to have some good reviews – I’d suggest at least 10, but more is better.  If you’re going to spend money on advertising, having reviews will help you spend your money more wisely. Remember, all reviews don’t need to be 4 or 5 stars. In fact, I think the reviews look more legitimate if there are a few 3 star reviews, not that you have any control over this. I just mention it because not everyone who reads your book will LOVE it and potential readers know this, so don’t worry when you get a few 3 star reviews. Hopefully your average is 4/5 or above.

I also agree that you shouldn’t spend more than you can afford. Pay attention to the ads – what they are charging and what money are you making. Keep in mind, the money they say you are making doesn’t take into account the discount – the 70% or 30% that Laurence mentions (item #5).

Note: I am not endorsing Books Go Social or the things they want to sell you in this post, but I know they are a good company and I do think they have author’s interests at heart – just below staying solvent (as all companies). I have not tried their free AMS ad course, so I can’t speak on that, but I think your keyword choice and your ad copy are two things that are very important with AMS ads. Those that can use computer-generated ad key words have an advantage. Unfortunately, that is not most of us, so we have to do our best.

Anyone who tries BGS free course, please share what you think. If I eek out some time to do it myself. I’ll also share what think.

Keep on Keeping on!

https://services4authors.com/2018/07/27/10-critical-things-to-know-before-you-spend-big-on-your-amazon-ads/

52 Sources For Free Music

close up photo of person playing piano

Photo by Juan Pablo Arenas on Pexels.com

Have you thought of putting together a video of your book?

It’s a creative way to advertise the story you want to share. It’s something I have yet to try, but with my new book: Chakra Magic (a fun grade school book about chakras), I’m probably going to give it a try, with a bit of help from my college-age daughter, who knows a lot more about Youtube than her mother, even though she is an engineer. (Just graduated as a biomedical engineer, I’m happy to say! Now onto grad school 🙂 )  I’ll need a bit of upbeat music so this list will come in handy. I thought it might come in handy to you too – if not now, maybe in the near future?!

Paul Carr has put together a very long list of 52 places to find music for your video.

Thanks Paul!

https://paulspagestoo.wordpress.com/2017/12/24/52-cool-places-to-find-music-and-sound-effects-for-your-videos-one-for-each-week-of-the-year/

 

Why Authors Should Not Use Social Media 

Menna Azzollini wrote this post about why authors shouldn’t use social media. I agree with some of the things she is saying. I don’t think social media is the greatest place to sell books, but I think it’s a good place to make connections to readers and writers and a place authors can support each other. Yes, you putting yourself out there might not get a lot of attention, but if you are supporting other authors and they are supporting you, then your reach gets a little wider 🙂

I also agree that it’s not good to spend too much time on social media. I set up my website posts to go to FB, Lk’d-in, and twitter so one thing I do goes to 4 places! I “like” and post other author’s posts to twitter and facebook, which doesn’t take much time, either.

I do like her list of other marketing options.

What do you think about social media for authors?

Source: Why Authors Should Not Use Social Media | TCK Publishing

Fast Track Guide To Fixing Your Book Description

Image result for image of a runner

Laurence O’Brien of BooksGoSocial reminds us how to create good book description copy – one of the key elements to book marketing.

———————

Step One: Watch this short 1 minute 21 seconds video.   Step Two:   Use strong active verbs instead of passive ones. If you’re describing a romance novel, for example, use words like: hot, steamy, spicy, scorching, passionate, burning. Use of…

Source: Fast Track Guide To Fixing Your Book Description | BooksGoSocial Resources