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Traditional Publishing, Anyone?

Christopher of the Story Reading Ape has passed along a nice post by Vian De Bod about traditional publishing.

De Bod doesn’t mention a couple very important points with traditional publishing. You still need to work with an editor before you try and sell you manuscript (ms) to an agent or publishing house. As you probably know, there is A LOT of competition out there, so your ms has to be the best it can be before you even think about selling it. That mean hiring an editor (after you’ve had your beta readers have a crack at it, of course.)

And De Bod suggests you need an agent. I agree. It’s really the only way to get your book noticed. But how to find an agent?

That’s not an easy thing. You can get the “Writer’s Marketplace” out of the library and find agents that way (always going to their website to get the latest information on submission requirements). But I have an even better way!

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I would suggest finding writer’s conferences in your area that have agents that are taking pitches. Getting to talk to a real agent is the best way to get in the door. Then practice, practice, practice your pitch. I’m sure if you googled “pitching to a book agent” you’ll get lots of advice. And sometimes those writer’s conferences will give you workshops on just that topic. I know my local conference will.

I am speaking at such a confernece – The Wisconsin Writers’ Institute – in April 12-15, Madison, WI.

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I’m speaking on two self-publishing panels dealing with self-publishing with three other wonderful self-published authors (Valerie Biel, Kimberli Bindschatel, Ann Voss Peterson). There will be agents at this conference and lots of information about “the Pathway to Publication,” including traditional publishing.

Conferences are also a great way to connect with other authors, maybe even some that already have agents. Ask around. Maybe their agent would be willing to take a look at your ms.

via Things Traditionally Published Authors Should Keep In Mind

Publishing Contracts – The Inside Skinny

Graeme Shimmin has written a great post about how exactly a publishing contract works and what it means. I’d definitely recommend you give it a read!

http://graemeshimmin.com/literary-contracts-guide-for-new-authors/

Working With Beta Readers

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Episode 5 of Mark Coker’s Apple Podcasts is about working with beta readers – A very important part of every writer’s process. Or it should be.

In this episode you’ll learn how to recruit beta readers, how to craft your questionnaire to collect the right feedback, and you’ll learn time-saving strategies to complete the round with minimal hassle.

Here are links to access the podcast:

Happy writing and editing!

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Everything You Wanted to Know about Self-Publishing But Were Afraid to Ask

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Mark Coker of Smashwords fame has come out with FREE, yes, FREE apple podcasts on self-publishing. I’ve had a sneak peek at the first 5 (he’s going to have new ones each month) and they are helpful to all authors, whether  you have yet to publish or you already have a few books out there.

And who can’t argue with FREE education!

Mark has been working in the ebook publishing world for many years and he sincerely has the author’s interest in mind. This is just such an example of what he’s done to promote indie publishing. So click on this link: Apple Podcast, or the image above and take a listen. It is well worth your time.

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Were Publishing Dreams Become Reality

 

 Infringement by Galaktika Magazine: Authors Guild and SFWA Reach Settlement

      

Don’t know if any of you had your story published by Galaktika Mag without your consent but maybe you know someone that has, so you might want to share this bit of good news from Writer Beware.

And thank you Authors Guild and SFWA for standing up for author’s rights!

Source: Writer Beware: Infringement Lawsuit

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Designing a Book Cover That Tells

I found this helpful post by Christopher Lentz who is a guest on “The Owl Lady’s” blog – Vivdrewa.me. I had never heard of the backward six scan we apparently all do. I also like his comment in his “squinting at it” section. What is prominent does depend on who you are as an author. I’m sure you’ve noticed how some (not all) prominent authors have their name almost as large or larger than the title. They are obviously selling themselves and their reputation that you’ll want that book you’re looking at. Most of us aren’t in this category – not yet anyway 😉
There – I learned my new one thing today. Hopefully I’ll learn a few more, too 😉

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Viv Drewa - The Owl Lady

By Guest Blogger Christopher Lentz

If you’re reading this, you’re probably a storyteller. That’s part “story” and part “teller.” So what do your book covers tell potential readers?

First confession: I may be new to the self-publishing world, but I’m not a newcomer to the universe of design and marketing. Since the launch of my novel,Blossom, I continue to be amazed by how many people are attracted to and comment about the book’s cover.

Though trends in romance cover designs come and go, timeless and tested truisms of marketing contributed to Blossom’s cover design. Here are five things I applied while designing what’s proving to be an impactful, engaging cover.

Second confession: If you’re looking for a guaranteed how-to list of tips for designing covers that will propel you to the heights of TheNew York Timesbestsellers list, this isn’t it. If you find one, let me…

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Print Piracy and Free Trade

My general take on print book priracy (or ebook priacy for that matter) – it’s not worth my energy and time to do anything about it. There are so many other positive things I need to do with my time related to my books (and my personal time for that matter), but David has given us some very good information about how the process all works, and good information and knowing the process that you’re a part of (whether you like it or not) is always a good thing.

I have also had an issue with my ebook and print books not being connected, but I was also able to fix that by contacting the kdp support people, and it only happened once. But if you want to know how to fix it yourself, David tells you how.

Source: The Book Designer – Practical advice to help build better books

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality