Tag Archive | amazon

How To Publish A Book Bundle

Nancy booksShelley Hitz explains how to publish a book bundle on Kindle – though it would be the same for any site you sell on. Basically, it’s putting all the books in one file and making a new image (like a box set) for it. Pretty simple, I guess. But unfortunately, she doesn’t say how to make the new box set image and I’m not so good with photo shop. I guess I have to ask some friends to help me. There are lots of people that are good with photo shop.

While you’re waiting for help with your new cover, make sure your series ebooks are connected. I know Amazon has a specific line that you put the same series name in for each book in the series (mine is “Rose series”) then the volume #. They are supposed to be displayed together when someone pulls up one book in the series. I know you can do that on Goodreads, too.

How To Publish A Book Bundle On Kindle.

E-book Formatting Explained

from spaceplace.nasa.gove

from spaceplace.nasa.gov

So you have finished your book, your beta readers have had their say and you’ve paid to have it edited. Now what? 

Well, the easiest place to start is to e-publish, not that print publishing is hard, but e-publishing is even easier. It only requires two things: 1. A front cover that is at least 1600 pixels wide by 2500 pixels tall. This will fit the requirements of kdp.amazon.com and smashwords.com (two of the sites I recommend you publish on, though there are others). 2. A properly formatted book. Item two is what I am going to focus on today.

There are two ways to upload your book on both Amazon and Smashwords: A formatted word doc or a mobi doc. I’ve done both and I’m not sure which is easier. I think perhaps creating the mobi file is a touch easier, but both require a bit of work on your part. Lets start with the word doc option.

Word Document:

For this option the best way to get it right is to follow Mark Coker’s formatting guide that he created for his Smashwords clientele. It’s free and if you follow that guide, your word doc will easily upload to Smashwords and Amazon. Sounds easy, but it does take a bit of time to do all the recommended steps.

Mobi Document:

amanzon logoI am aware of two programs that allow you to create a fairly quick mobi or epub file: Jutoh and Scrivener. Mobi is used for kindle and epubs are used for everyone else (nook, kobo, ipad or any other android reader). I have viewed a webinar for Scrivener and it looks like a fine program – has a few more bells and whistles and probably works better for non-fiction authors since it’s a lot easier to move chapters around and you can load websites very easily. But I purchased Jutoh and have been happy with the results. Both programs cost approximately $40, by the way. Very reasonable! Jutoh banner01

Jutoh: Jutoh is pretty easy to use. There is a small learning curve (as their would be with Scrivener) and Jutoh has a very good user’s guide/help section to the program if you need it. The nice thing about both of these programs is that you can upload you book and create the links to each chapter without all the putzing needed when working with a word doc. You can also easily put in hyperlinks to your book’s website or sites to buy your other books – if you have more than one. **Be aware that Amazon and Smashwords don’t accept documents that have links to other people’s websites, so don’t put them in. They will make you take them out.

One other caution for Jutoh specifically – I recommend you use Jutoh’s styles when formatting your book (centering, special formatting), it will look better in the end product. One time-saver for you is if you put in page breaks in the word doc that you download to Jutoh, it will automatically make these the chapters breaks. You can do it within the program, but doing it in word first will save you time. Just pick the “chapters by page break” option when setting it up in Jutoh.

Once it’s uploaded and formatted the way you want (remember no fonts bigger than 16 point or unusual fonts – ereaders aren’t sophisticated enough to handle these things) you pick the format you want. As mentioned, for kdp.amazon you want the mobi format. Smashwords will also accept mobi files, so you might as well start there. When you’ve selected mobi you hit “compile” and the program will create a folder in your computer’s “document” file titled “Jutoh Documents.” It will put the mobi and Jutoh file there. The nice thing about Jutoh is that if you hit the “error” tab at the bottom of the Jutoh screen, it will show you all the mistakes you make and tell you what the error is. If you click on a error message, it will take you to that error in your document. How cool is that!

The next step is to check the document. For kindle, download the free kindle reading app for PC or Mac. Look through the whole document for formatting issues and make sure the chapter and web links work.

adobeI always create a epub file because not everyone has a kindle and when giving away free copies of the book, it’s nice to have that option. Obviously, ebooks are a lot cheaper to give away than paper books. To  create a epub file, pick the epub option then compile again. Correct any errors, then download Adobe’s Digital Editions. Digital Editions reads epubs. This link will give you the program for either PC or Mac formats. Now it’s time to visit Smashwords and kdp.amazon and set up your accounts. Both sites make it very easy to upload your cover and interior files. Then let everyone know it’s there! If you have any trouble with this process, don’t hesitate to contact me.

my imageChristine Keleny CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Book Marketing 101

image from edit5523naz.wikispaces.com

image from edit5523naz.wikispaces.com

So what does every author (whether from the traditional published side or the self-published side) struggle with? Book Marketing, of course. Just google those two words and see all the sites that will try and sell you some wonderful, surefire way to market your book. Before you actually hire someone, there are some basics book marketing things that your should try. (And only pay someone if you have a personal recommendation from someone you trust. Because marketing is such an issue for authors, there are a lot of people trying to hoodwink you, so beware!)

Some basic things to try:

♦ put yourself on goodreads as an author and do a book giveaway. It’s a great way to get seen and to make contacts! It’s also a way to get reviews.

♦ get as many reviews on amazon and goodreads as you can. Actually, this really should be your number one thing to do and something you never stop doing. It’s not easy because people are reluctant to do it but Reviews Sell Books! Giving away some ebooks for review, or discounted paper books to get a review. It is well worth the cost to you.

♦ put a review request in any paper book (as a book mark sort of deal with you signing the request) and in the back of any ebook.

♦ do local events at libraries, coffee shops and bookstores. Search out groups that might be interested in the topic or genre of your book and offer to come and talk.

♦ search for craft fairs and books fairs in your area. I have made many sales at craft fairs and made lots of good contacts, and it’s fun to talk to readers and have them come back the next year for another one of my books because they liked the first.

♦ I assume you have a website. That’s a very easy thing to do and very necessary in this day and age. I have mine through wordpress (my books blog [free] and my business blog [$99/year]). They are very easy and can even be free if you want.

♦ If you have a facebook page for you and your books (not a personal page but one devoted to writing, reading and your books, as well), that is a plus but not a must have. If you blog at all on your website (again, not necessary but an added perk to readers), then you can easily link your posts to your facebook page. Believe it or not, your readers want to know about you. Build a fan base by talking to them (and send a few discounted or free items their way just for following your website! They deserve that much).

These are some very basic ideas, but the more you do, the more people you can encounter and people (especially fans!) are your greatest asset.

And good luck!
Christine Keleny

my image

How Authors Can Survive Among the Glut of Ebooks

Mark Coker of Smashwords gives us some grim statistics, but also shares some very concrete ways to keep on keepin’ on.

I agree – looking at the long haul is the way to go. I first published in 2008 and I still get sales from that first book. For me, it’s never been about the big launch with big first sales – though there is some of that, of course. It has been more about staying the course, keeping up with my writing and publishing, picking and choosing my marketing strategies and learning new things with each new book I publish (Just published book #6 – Will the Real Carolyn Keene Please Stand Up). I don’t exclusively write and publish – I do have a day job (that I love, by the way, because it’s helping others publish!), but I am not tossing in the towel because there are a lot of others writing and publishing these days. In fact, I encourage people to write and publish (through the writing and publishing workshops I do for libraries and school children). I think there is room for everyone!

Thanks for the insights, Mark!

Nice illustrations Elizabeth!

Smashwords.

Publishing a Paperback with IngramSpark

Abigail Carter – of Writer.ly – has shared some very helpful information for publishing with IngramSpark/LighteningSource.

I have published through createspace/Amazon, have had my books published with a brick and mortar printer in my area and plan on using Ingram/LighteningSource (same company) to get on their distribution list. I wonder if she started with Lightening Sources if it would have been any easier. I think I remember reading that somewhere but I’m not sure about that.

Abigail shares some insights that will make the process easier. Ingram has a long way to go to make the process as easy as Amazon does.

When I try it and if I find out any other helpful tips, I’ll let you-all know!

Publishing a Paperback with IngramSpark – Writer.ly Community.

Is Kindle Unlimited Bad for Authors?

Have you heard about this new offering from Amazon. I have to agree with Mark here and just like KDP Select limits Indies options, so does this program. I like that KDP Select lets you opt out after a certain amount of time. I used it for one of my ebooks and opted out when I allowed to by the program. I think most authors do this. I don’t want to sell my book exclusively to anyone.

I have not gone into the details of this subscription service, but since it requires you to be in KDP Select to be a part of it, I’d read the fine print before I jumped into that boat as an author. As a reader, I don’t read on my nook enough to subscribe to any ebook subscription service, but that’s just me.

Smashwords: Is Kindle Unlimited Bad for Authors?.

Are There Still Pros to Traditional Publishing?

from rahulbemba.blogspot.com

from rahulbemba.blogspot.com

For those who aren’t sure if they want to do self-publishing, Brook Warner of Shewrites gives us some reasons why you may want to go in that direction when thinking of publishing.

It’s really a matter of your goals, your time, and your money.

As I’ve said before, I encourage anyone who asks me about traditional publishing to do self-publishing while they are trying to pitch their story to an agent or publisher. It can only help if your story does well in the self-publishing realm, and the only thing you are going to do different when you self-publish (ebooks to start) is create a cover.

Either option will cause you hire an editor (and if you are serious about making your book a commercial success, I’d encourage you to find a professional.)

And to put an ebook on say, Amazon or Smashwords, you can do that using a properly formatted word doc. Smashwords has a free guide to help you through that process, and if you want to hire someone to do that for you, it’s probably only $100+ or – depending on the size and complexity of your book design.

Are There Still Pros to Traditional Publishing? – She Writes.