Tag Archive | self-publishing

Current Trends in Traditional Book Publishing: Fiction, Nonfiction and YA 

Jane Friedman has updated us on the currect trends for traditional publishing, but I’m guessing some of what is happening in traditional publishing is happening is self-publishing as well.

Keep in mind, what is trending now might or might not be something you want to look at writing.  It takes time to get a book out, a good book – well written, well edited, well designed and proofed. And self-pub authors in particular need to take that time. Sometimes you only get one chance with a reader.

So unless you’ve got the inside scoop on what will be the next big thing in writing, it’s usually best to stick to writing what you are passionate about.

But that is just my opinion. 🙂

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The rise of Millennial nostalgia and graphic novels, the decline of political tell-alls and publisher-driven marketing: all of this and more in 2019 trends.

Source: Current Trends in Traditional Book Publishing: Fiction, Nonfiction and YA | Jane Friedman

Book Banning – Is it Right?

With the fairly recent (in our countries history, that is) ease of self-publishing, the notions of free spreech and no book banning are getting harder to defend.

Is it okay for people with, what the average person would say are, really out there ideas (e.g., the holocaust never happened, the government really took down the twin towers in NY…) to publish those out there ideas?

And what about hate speech/writing? Is that all right to sell in your local bookstore?

Read Ron Charles’s post on the Washington Post’s website and let me know what you think.

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Confessions of an accidental censor.

Source: A hateful, conspiracy-filled book just got harder to buy. That’s no cause for celebration. – The Washington Post

Traditional Publishing, Anyone?

Christopher of the Story Reading Ape has passed along a nice post by Vian De Bod about traditional publishing.

De Bod doesn’t mention a couple very important points with traditional publishing. You still need to work with an editor before you try and sell you manuscript (ms) to an agent or publishing house. As you probably know, there is A LOT of competition out there, so your ms has to be the best it can be before you even think about selling it. That mean hiring an editor (after you’ve had your beta readers have a crack at it, of course.)

And De Bod suggests you need an agent. I agree. It’s really the only way to get your book noticed. But how to find an agent?

That’s not an easy thing. You can get the “Writer’s Marketplace” out of the library and find agents that way (always going to their website to get the latest information on submission requirements). But I have an even better way!

excited gif

I would suggest finding writer’s conferences in your area that have agents that are taking pitches. Getting to talk to a real agent is the best way to get in the door. Then practice, practice, practice your pitch. I’m sure if you googled “pitching to a book agent” you’ll get lots of advice. And sometimes those writer’s conferences will give you workshops on just that topic. I know my local conference will.

I am speaking at such a confernece – The Wisconsin Writers’ Institute – in April 12-15, Madison, WI.

writers' institute

I’m speaking on two self-publishing panels dealing with self-publishing with three other wonderful self-published authors (Valerie Biel, Kimberli Bindschatel, Ann Voss Peterson). There will be agents at this conference and lots of information about “the Pathway to Publication,” including traditional publishing.

Conferences are also a great way to connect with other authors, maybe even some that already have agents. Ask around. Maybe their agent would be willing to take a look at your ms.

via Things Traditionally Published Authors Should Keep In Mind

Designing a Book Cover That Tells

I found this helpful post by Christopher Lentz who is a guest on “The Owl Lady’s” blog – Vivdrewa.me. I had never heard of the backward six scan we apparently all do. I also like his comment in his “squinting at it” section. What is prominent does depend on who you are as an author. I’m sure you’ve noticed how some (not all) prominent authors have their name almost as large or larger than the title. They are obviously selling themselves and their reputation that you’ll want that book you’re looking at. Most of us aren’t in this category – not yet anyway 😉
There – I learned my new one thing today. Hopefully I’ll learn a few more, too 😉

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Viv Drewa - The Owl Lady

By Guest Blogger Christopher Lentz

If you’re reading this, you’re probably a storyteller. That’s part “story” and part “teller.” So what do your book covers tell potential readers?

First confession: I may be new to the self-publishing world, but I’m not a newcomer to the universe of design and marketing. Since the launch of my novel,Blossom, I continue to be amazed by how many people are attracted to and comment about the book’s cover.

Though trends in romance cover designs come and go, timeless and tested truisms of marketing contributed to Blossom’s cover design. Here are five things I applied while designing what’s proving to be an impactful, engaging cover.

Second confession: If you’re looking for a guaranteed how-to list of tips for designing covers that will propel you to the heights of TheNew York Timesbestsellers list, this isn’t it. If you find one, let me…

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Print Piracy and Free Trade

My general take on print book priracy (or ebook priacy for that matter) – it’s not worth my energy and time to do anything about it. There are so many other positive things I need to do with my time related to my books (and my personal time for that matter), but David has given us some very good information about how the process all works, and good information and knowing the process that you’re a part of (whether you like it or not) is always a good thing.

I have also had an issue with my ebook and print books not being connected, but I was also able to fix that by contacting the kdp support people, and it only happened once. But if you want to know how to fix it yourself, David tells you how.

Source: The Book Designer – Practical advice to help build better books

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

11 Tips on Getting Your Book Published

Melody Moezzi has some very good points about getting published. There is no one way and no one secret. As you have probably heard many times, writing a good story is number one. And I like that she has reading as number two. I would concern on the order of both of those points. I also like her point about doing your research. There is a lot to learn when you’re trying to get published (self or otherwise) and the best way to spend your money wisely is to know what you’re spending your money on, so ask around and read and keep your ears open. And then there is the infinite amount of patience that she doesn’t mention but is inherent in this process.

Source: 11 Tips on Getting Your Book Published

Rites of Submission: Cover Letters and Query Letters

struggleFor those who are looking to publish with a big (traditional) publishing house, either while you’re self-publishing or instead of self-publishing (it doesn’t matter these days), Jacqueline has posted some information about the very important cover and query letters.

And it goes without saying (but it’s important so I’ll say it anyway), your manuscript has to be as best as you and your editor can make it.

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Sample cover letters, query letters, and comments on the art of writing them, by Jacqueline K. Ogburn, published as part of a WWW site dedicated to children’s books and the writing and illustrating of them.

Source: Rites of Submission: Cover Letters and Query Letters

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality