Tag Archive | traditional publishing

The Pros and Cons of Independent Publishing: Part One | Valerie Biel

Valerie Biel of Lost Lake Press, lays out the good and the bad of both traditional and indie publishing in a clear, easy to understand way. If you’ve ever questioned why to do one or the other, take a look at this post.

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Welcome to a three-part series on the pros and cons of independent or self publishing. This is going to be an honest discussion about what you need to consider before deciding which route is best for your publishing goals and skill set. First, we’ll look at overall concerns within the positives and negatives of each type of publishing. Part two will dive into potential earnings and royalties along with the business concerns you must address for successful independent publishing.

Source: The Pros and Cons of Independent Publishing: Part One | Valerie Biel

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Do I Need a Platform and If So, How High?

Anne Greenwood Brown talks about platforms for authors. She showcases a fiction author who’s book has in interesting premise – celebery crushes.

Notice she says getting a following can take years. I think she’s right, for most of us authors, so patience and persistance is a must, whether you’re going the traditional route or self-publishing.

Have a read…

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In 2010, when I first dipped my toe into the publishing world, the biggest mystery to me was—besides figuring out the difference between a query and a synopsis—this thing called a “platform.” At th…

Source: Do I Need a Platform and If So, How High?

The Down Side of Signing a Book Contract 

I agree with this writer, we spend a lot of time talking about how to get published and not enough time about what to do after you sign a contract with a book publisher.

This author got into hot water thinking she had made it; she signed with one of the big 5 publishers and then another publisher. She got a nice, big advance and was working hard on her craft. What is so bad about that? I’d be excited too. I’d have thought I’d made it too! But she tells us what happened next.

Source: How To Lose A Third Of A Million Dollars Without Really Trying

Are these reasons to avoid traditional publishing. Mostly, I’d say no. But it does help you understand how the traditional book world works, and if you end up signing a contract that is associated with an any kind of an advance, you need to know what to expect and not expect from that publisher or agent going forward.

The decision to pursue self-publishing over traditional publish still is mostly about your goals, your time, and your budget. But it is good to know what you’re getting into when you sign the dotted line!

Stay Away From Traditional Book Publishing?

Image result for authors signing books images

Dean Wesley Smith really doesn’t like traditional publishing (see link below). I’m not as dead set against it as Dean. I think it might be right for certain people – not for me, mind you – most of the time.

I have tried to find an agent for my middle grade novel series (my Agnes Kelly Mystery Adventures) to try and traditionally publish, to get greater access to the school market. But it has gotten into 3 schools anyway, through people I know who are middle grade teachers and one teacher who found me at a book sale and really liked my book. So it is still possible to get into schools, but it’s not easy.

In general, however, I find I like the creative control – of the writing, of the cover, of the interior design (which is why I help others with these tasks as well 🙂 )- and I like the control of when it gets out there and how much I am selling it for (besides a significant royalty over traditional publishing). Of course, that means me taking on the risks – paying for editing, taking the time to find out what the process is and how best to do it, keeping abreast of the book business…

Since most of the time with a traditional publisher you have to do most of the marketing anyway, why give them rights and lose the control, and wait and wait for the book to come out and make changes to it that you may or may not agree with and… Well, you get the point.

But for some who don’t have any interest in the process, can be patient, and don’t want to put any money into the game, or want to get to a difficult market – such as my example of getting into schools – it might be the way to go.

The point is to know what you’re getting into with either direction.

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Source: Stay Away From Traditional Book Publishing

Traditional Publishing, Anyone?

Christopher of the Story Reading Ape has passed along a nice post by Vian De Bod about traditional publishing.

De Bod doesn’t mention a couple very important points with traditional publishing. You still need to work with an editor before you try and sell you manuscript (ms) to an agent or publishing house. As you probably know, there is A LOT of competition out there, so your ms has to be the best it can be before you even think about selling it. That mean hiring an editor (after you’ve had your beta readers have a crack at it, of course.)

And De Bod suggests you need an agent. I agree. It’s really the only way to get your book noticed. But how to find an agent?

That’s not an easy thing. You can get the “Writer’s Marketplace” out of the library and find agents that way (always going to their website to get the latest information on submission requirements). But I have an even better way!

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I would suggest finding writer’s conferences in your area that have agents that are taking pitches. Getting to talk to a real agent is the best way to get in the door. Then practice, practice, practice your pitch. I’m sure if you googled “pitching to a book agent” you’ll get lots of advice. And sometimes those writer’s conferences will give you workshops on just that topic. I know my local conference will.

I am speaking at such a confernece – The Wisconsin Writers’ Institute – in April 12-15, Madison, WI.

writers' institute

I’m speaking on two self-publishing panels dealing with self-publishing with three other wonderful self-published authors (Valerie Biel, Kimberli Bindschatel, Ann Voss Peterson). There will be agents at this conference and lots of information about “the Pathway to Publication,” including traditional publishing.

Conferences are also a great way to connect with other authors, maybe even some that already have agents. Ask around. Maybe their agent would be willing to take a look at your ms.

via Things Traditionally Published Authors Should Keep In Mind

11 Tips on Getting Your Book Published

Melody Moezzi has some very good points about getting published. There is no one way and no one secret. As you have probably heard many times, writing a good story is number one. And I like that she has reading as number two. I would concern on the order of both of those points. I also like her point about doing your research. There is a lot to learn when you’re trying to get published (self or otherwise) and the best way to spend your money wisely is to know what you’re spending your money on, so ask around and read and keep your ears open. And then there is the infinite amount of patience that she doesn’t mention but is inherent in this process.

Source: 11 Tips on Getting Your Book Published

Rites of Submission: Cover Letters and Query Letters

struggleFor those who are looking to publish with a big (traditional) publishing house, either while you’re self-publishing or instead of self-publishing (it doesn’t matter these days), Jacqueline has posted some information about the very important cover and query letters.

And it goes without saying (but it’s important so I’ll say it anyway), your manuscript has to be as best as you and your editor can make it.

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Sample cover letters, query letters, and comments on the art of writing them, by Jacqueline K. Ogburn, published as part of a WWW site dedicated to children’s books and the writing and illustrating of them.

Source: Rites of Submission: Cover Letters and Query Letters

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