Novels rule when it comes to e-book sales, children’s books dominate print – kind of.

The headline for this article is a little misleading. If you look at the stats the writer supplies, 4 (maybe 5 – don’t know the novel “Milk and Honey”) of the top 10 print book sellers are kids books, the other are other books.

For ebook sales – 4/10 are “kids” books – all Harry Potter books, which are novels, yes, but really written for kids. They are enjoyed by people of all ages, but again, the headline is misleading.

And this is just Amazon sales. People do buy books in bookstores (print) and other ebook retailers (B&N, ibookstore, kobo, Scribd, smashwords…)

Interesting stats, though.


Some people love their e-books. Others, like me, not so much. I’ll read e-books, especially if I’m traveling or if the book is a thousand-page tome, but otherwise I like the tactile nature of a good book. I like the smell of the paper. I also don’t like to have to think about charging an e-reader.

Source: Novels rule when it comes to e-book sales, children’s books dominate print | Thinknum Media

CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Writing Tip: Conflict

I’m working with a client that has written a story – the pantser method – that now needs some plotting work. This is not a bad way to write. I write this way most of the time. It is a slower way to write but if, like this writer – who is retired, you aren’t particularly in a hurry, it’s a fine way to write. I’m not about to tell anyone how to write.

But the story, now done, does need plotting work to pull the story theme together in a compelling way. I was reading a post on plotting vs panting on Valerie Biel’s wonderful writer’s site and came across this wonderful tip by Deeanne Gist.  It is a very helpful tip when taking a second look at your story, or planning it out for the first time (whatever way floats your boat). Take a look:

Lessons From BuzzFeed on How to Grow and Engage Your Audience

Dan Blank (WeGrowMedia) talks about growing your audience, as a author, with Ze (Zay) Frank of Buzzfeed.

Image result for buzzfeed logo

As with many things Dan talks about, it seems to be a matter of connecting and “collaboration” on a personal level with people. I think you can use that word “collaboration” in a few different ways. But I took it more as connecting.

And the fact that Ze says with some of his more viral posts, he doesn’t really know why they went viral, says a lot too.

Dan even says: But for the 1,000 other things you do to try to develop an audience for your work — articles, events, interviews, blogs, newsletters, social media — don’t assume you know what will work. Experiment and allow others to help you learn what does and doesn’t work to engage them.

That means trying a lot of different things. What I have found is things I do in person, work the best and sometimes lead to things I can’t predict (as I mentioned in this post I did on marketing).

Another point they make is you can’t be in one place (online or in person) and expect to reach a lot of people.

Ze says that only 15-17% of views of Buzzfeed content comes from Buzzfeed’s website and the same percent from their other channels: emails, social media… I think that is amazing! A big company like that and that’s how many people come to their site or visit their social media and share their content?!

What does this mean? Same thing, really. You can’t put up a website and decide that is good enough. You need to be in a lot of different places. And some (most?) of the sharing, of course, you have no control over.

Here is the whole post, if you want to read it.

________________________

Source: Lessons From BuzzFeed on How to Grow and Engage Your Audience – WeGrowMedia – Dan Blank

my imageCKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Spring with Emily Dickinson – Brain Pickings

We always need inspiration. Spring definitely gets me going! How about you?

ckbooksblog

Feeling inspired by spring. Here are some thoughts from Miss Emily on the subject. Thanks to Maria Popova

“Today is very beautiful — just as bright, just as blue, just as green and as white, and as crimson, as the cherry trees full in bloom, and the half opening peach blossoms, and the grass just…

Source: Spring with Emily Dickinson – Brain Pickings

View original post

Reader’s Favorite Award Deadline Soon

Spring is the time to enter book award contests.

There are a limited number of big-name books awards available to self-published authors. Reader’s Favorite is one of them.

qxoavngkreyiwvd   

Jim Carrey Gold Medal

Jim Carrey

The regular deadline for this year is May 1, so you’ve got time yet to sign up. If you’re not quite ready, June 1 is the drop dead deadline, which will cost you more, of course.

I have entered this contest a couple different times. Have not won yet, but earned a very nice 5 star review. You can also request more than one review, whether you win or not.

The cost is $109 now or $119 on June 1.  They have 140+ genres. You get a chance to get a traditional publishing contract, win money, be represented by a marketing and PR firm, and have your book made into a movie. And of course the publicity would be wonderful with such a large, international award.

I also recommend the IPPY Award, The Brag Award  (adult and children’s books), the Moombean Children’s Award (for children’s stories, obviously),

uazgskcthsnhsgl

Eriq La Salle

Eriq LaSalle – Actor/Director

Happy Spring!

d44da341bb32716bdf8ff9cf713ce955

CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

 

An Incredible Marketing Case Study, with Author-Illustrator Lori Richmond (and Christine Keleny) 

“The most interesting marketing opportunities are those that are unconventional.” That is how author-illustrator Lori Richmond sums up the case study we are about to present here. In to…


This is the beginning of an interview Dan Blank had with author and illustrator Lori Richmond about an innovative marketing opportunity she saw and followed through on. I wholly agree with Dan – this marketing effort Richmond made has paid off in many small and cumulative ways for her.

I think that is how most of the best marketing works for most authors. It’s not that one post or that one event you go to or that one person you meet, but over time, it’s all those posts, all those events, all those people you meet who add up to opportunities to share yourself and your stories with others.

Everyone is looking for a quick fix related to marketing their book(s). Think about it – if it existed, don’t you think someone would have found it by now. It takes time and effort, lots of efforts, actually, and missteps (lets not call it failure – it’s a learning process, right?), but there will be targets hit along the way and lots of fun experiences, too!

Here’s my example: I recently was invited by a librarian that I met at a art and craft sale to present at an evening talk event her library has a few times a year. Now this library is probably smaller than 1000 square feet and this town has a population so small that they can’t get a grocery store to move in where the old one stood for years. But this innovative librarian has partnered with a small pizza/ice creams shop (Central 52) in town (a big deal for this town) to host evening speakers a few times a year on all kinds of topics.

I showed up early, met the owner (a woman), and had an ice cream while I set up my books for display. Six people came out on a cold, wet spring evening to hear me talk about writing and publishing. It was a interactive, intimate group and I made some new acquaintances, had my picture taken with the librarian and her friend, which was posted on the shop website (which I then reposted, of course), and I was connected to the daughter of one of the participants who does editing (I’m always looking for proofing help for my clients), and I sold 5 books!

Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling, indoor

I’m also going to go back for pizza with my husband. It smelled really good and we’re always looking for new pizza places to try. Who would have thought about all these connections and possibilities from a library that is no bigger than 1000 square feet in a town that isn’t large enough to have a grocery store.

Maybe that will be the end of it, but maybe it won’t. One never knows.

So keep, keepin’ on!  Get out there! Meet people! Keep your eyes and ears open. Over time you can’t predict how it will pay off, but it will.

—————————-

Source: An Incredible Marketing Case Study, with Author-Illustrator Lori Richmond – WeGrowMedia – Dan Blank

Are Writing Contests Worth the Fees? 

I’ve shared this information before, but it’s always good to review. Here’s a great post on the topic from Valerie Biel.

Thanks Valerie!

———————————

We all want a shiny gold sticker for our cover! With more and more writing contests popping up every day, it’s important to determine which ones are reputable, whether entry fees are acceptable, and how to spot dangerous terms that infringe on your copyright. To watch a video version of this blog click below:

Source: Are Writing Contests Worth the Fees? | Valerie Biel

my image Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality