Archives

16 Military Phrases and Cliches That Screenwriters/Book writers Need to Stop Using 

Ken Miyamoto knows screenplays so you can be sure he knows what he’s talking about related to his post on writing military cliches. Even though he’s talking about writing for film (or TV), the same would go for fiction.

So if you write military based fiction, take a gander at Ken’s post.

——————————-

Ken Miyamoto lists military phrases and cliches that screenwriters should avoid to create a more authentic military-driven screenplay.

Source: 16 Military Phrases and Cliches That Screenwriters Need to Stop Using – ScreenCraft

Writing Tip: Conflict

I’m working with a client that has written a story – the pantser method – that now needs some plotting work. This is not a bad way to write. I write this way most of the time. It is a slower way to write but if, like this writer – who is retired, you aren’t particularly in a hurry, it’s a fine way to write. I’m not about to tell anyone how to write.

But the story, now done, does need plotting work to pull the story theme together in a compelling way. I was reading a post on plotting vs panting on Valerie Biel’s wonderful writer’s site and came across this wonderful tip by Deeanne Gist.  It is a very helpful tip when taking a second look at your story, or planning it out for the first time (whatever way floats your boat). Take a look:

8 Mundane Elements That Slow Down Your Story 

Image result for images of walking slow

Jane Friedman has picked a few writing tips from Jordon Rosenfeld’s book “How to Write a Page Turner” that aren’t the usual: watch out for adverbs, passive voice, flowery dialogue tags… Items that might slow down your story!

———————————-

Realism has its role, but don’t let it bog down your novel. Heed the advice of bestselling author Jordan Rosenfeld about pitfalls that can bore your reader.

Source: 8 Mundane Elements You Should Cut From Your Story | Jane Friedman

5 Writing Tips: Barbara Kingsolver

The tips Barbara Kingsolver is aren’t new (other than the last one, perhaps, which is kind of interesting), but they are good reminders.

p.s. I listened to “Unsheltered” and I enjoyed it. Kingsolver is a wonderful writer. It was well-researched, of course, and interesting, though not necessarily a page turner.

————————-

The enterprise of writing a book has to feel like walking into a cathedral.

Source: 5 Writing Tips: Barbara Kingsolver

How to Use Paragraph Breaks to Guide the Reader’s Experience 

Always good information from Ms Weiland. Here is a recent post about how and why to use paragraph breaks. To help us all make reading an even more pleasant experience for the people we write for!

Enjoy!

————————————

Writers must use paragraph breaks to direct a reader’s experience of the story’s action and pacing. Here are three guiding principles to keep in mind.

Source: Critique: How to Use Paragraph Breaks to Guide the Reader’s Experience – Helping Writers Become Authors

CKBooks Publishing
Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

“Don’t lose faith and quit on yourself.” Interview with New York Times Bestselling Author Thomas Greanias 

images

I get Dan Blank’s e-newsletter and this week he talks about the power we have as writers with the idea that we are starting a new year so we have the opportunity to move forward with ideas we might have as writers. This allows us to take advantage of the time we have and start telling the story you want to share – to make a plan!

I thought you might like to listen to the podcast he did with New York Times bestselling author Thomas Greanias. Come to find out, Thomas is from my neighboring state of Illinois!

———————————

Today I’m excited to share my interview with New York Times bestselling author Thomas Greanias. What jumped out at me the most was his advice to writers, and how they have a power that they o…

Source: “Don’t lose faith and quit on yourself.” My Interview with New York Times Bestselling Author Thomas Greanias – WeGrowMedia – Dan Blank

Tips Naming Your Characters 

Ever have trouble figuring out names for your characters? It’s not usually an issue I have, though I have made the mistake of naming 2 characters with the same first name, kind of (Lilly and Lilly Mae). I did it on purpose because one was white and one was black and it was a way to make a point, but it did give me a few issues when both characters were in the same room.

Another good place to look for names – your local obituaries! Helps with matching age and ethnicity with a name choice.

Valerie Biel, on her blog, with Kristin Oakley, discusses naming character and gives us lots of different reference posts on the topic.

Source: Naming Your Characters | Valerie Biel