Tag Archive | jane friedman

Some Website Builders for Authors 

Thinking about setting up a website and not sure which company might be best to use?

This post by Alessandra Torre doesn’t go into any depth, but it gives you a bit of information about three of the most common companies.

I use wordpress for two of my websites: my personal one (free), and my work one (this one you’re on -$99/year, site ground for my domain name $15.95/year). I use wix for my books ($126/year for a 3 year contract, Hover for the domain name $15.17/year).

My wordpress accounts are not ones where I have to know code (wordpress.com), so they were fairly easy to set up. It takes a lot of time, but it’s fairly user friendly. There is also a different type of wordpress account you can have that takes more computer knowledge (self-hosting wordpress. I think that’s the type Alessandra is referring to). I know Jane Friedman has blogged on setting up a website, including a wordpress account, so if you want to learn more, go to her site.

I agree that wix is fairly easy to use but both wordpress (my type of account) and wix take a bit of computer knowledge, but neither requires coding. I don’t think the “just a few hours” comment Alessandra makes is quite accurate, but it won’t take you weeks, maybe days.

I am not a computer wiz by any means so I understand if you would prefer to have someone else do it for you. I highly recommend Valerie Biel at Lost Lake Press for setting up your website. She is an author as well, so she knows where we are coming from and what we need. I am also familiar with Joanne Sprott – Cosmic Whispers Design; she’s part of an editor group I am also a part of where she was recommended as a web designer (EFA – Editorial Freelance Association).

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Your author website is the cornerstone of your brand and should highlight your books, yourself, and your newsletter signup. If you don’t have a website yet – don’t worry! There are several easy website builders that will allow a complete novice to build a site in just a few hours.

Source: Best Website Builders for Authors — Alessandra Torre Ink

Your Writing Community 

from mythic scribes

In Jane Friedman’s blog, Susan DeFreitas writes a guest post on the advantages of a writing community to spur your writing and support you when you need it most. I think even more so, a writing community makes you a better writer, especially if you’re able to connect with a critique group of good writers. Remember, you’ll only be as good as the best writer in your group, so choose your group wisely.

Do your critique members have a published book(s)? How well does that book(s) do in the reviews? Of course, your critique mates don’t all have to be published authors, but someone who has made it through the whole process (traditional or self-publishing, it matters not) will know more about the craft than someone who hasn’t.

And you’ll always learn something by reading and commenting on someone else’s work, in addition to reading the comments of other on that same piece.

And if you join a group that doesn’t seem to be working for you, politely bow out. You’ll be doing everyone a favor. No one does good work if they don’t want to be somewhere.

But where to find a critique group?

Ask around, of course. Look on facebook in your area. Join online writing groups and ask if anyone has an opening in their critique group. Ask on Linkedin writers groups. Ask at writing conferences (when those are a thing again – Ug!). I’m sure there are Instagram writers groups too, though I’m not on Instagram so I have no clue. I know you can find writers on twitter. Most of my writing friends are on twitter. I would suggest looking for a group that is writing in your genre, but maybe that is obvious.

Take a look at Susan’s post and she what wisdom she has to share.

Hang in there, everyone!

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Don’t feel like you have to go it alone—others are on the same journey, ready to offer encouragement and applaud your hard-earned victories.

Source: Developing a Writing Practice, Part 2: Community | Jane Friedman 

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Current Trends in Traditional Book Publishing: Fiction, Nonfiction and YA 

Jane Friedman has updated us on the currect trends for traditional publishing, but I’m guessing some of what is happening in traditional publishing is happening is self-publishing as well.

Keep in mind, what is trending now might or might not be something you want to look at writing.  It takes time to get a book out, a good book – well written, well edited, well designed and proofed. And self-pub authors in particular need to take that time. Sometimes you only get one chance with a reader.

So unless you’ve got the inside scoop on what will be the next big thing in writing, it’s usually best to stick to writing what you are passionate about.

But that is just my opinion. 🙂

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The rise of Millennial nostalgia and graphic novels, the decline of political tell-alls and publisher-driven marketing: all of this and more in 2019 trends.

Source: Current Trends in Traditional Book Publishing: Fiction, Nonfiction and YA | Jane Friedman

8 Mundane Elements That Slow Down Your Story 

Image result for images of walking slow

Jane Friedman has picked a few writing tips from Jordon Rosenfeld’s book “How to Write a Page Turner” that aren’t the usual: watch out for adverbs, passive voice, flowery dialogue tags… Items that might slow down your story!

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Realism has its role, but don’t let it bog down your novel. Heed the advice of bestselling author Jordan Rosenfeld about pitfalls that can bore your reader.

Source: 8 Mundane Elements You Should Cut From Your Story | Jane Friedman