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So You’ve Decided to Submit Your Manuscript (Guest Post)…

I tend to write and share posts about self-publishing because I think that it makes sense for most writers to go that direction, and for a myriad reason. But what I suggest to any of my clients or writers I am talking to who want to go the traditional route is to do both: self-publish and try and get a traditional publisher. It used to be that you couldn’t do both, but that is not the case any longer. The better you do as a self-published author, the more likely you will be picked up by a traditional house.

Of course, there is no reason at all that you can’t just go for traditional publishing but be prepared for a lot of work and a long, long wait. Of course, there are always rare exceptions to this, but this is the norm. That’s just one reason I suggest, while you’re working on getting traditionally published, self-publish and start building a fan base. It can only help!

Thanks to Chris (from Reading Ape’s blog) and Helen Jones for the post.

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Where Publishing Dreams Become Reality

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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If you’re serious about being traditionally published you will need an agent. The majority of publishers don’t accept unsolicited manuscripts, so finding someone to represent you and your work is essential for getting that elusive book deal. I’ve been down the submission path myself (and have the pile of rejection letters to prove it). As it turned out, I wasn’t ready at the time, and neither was my book, but I didn’t let it get me down (too much). Instead, I went online, joined a writing forum, read as much as I could, attended a seminar and gave my book to several more people to read. And I learnt a lot, both about the type of book I was writing and about how to submit to agents. So I thought I’d share it with you.

  1. Stick to the guidelines. Now, this may seem pretty basic stuff, but it is so

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