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Amazon’s Hachette Dispute Foreshadows What’s Next for Indie Authors

If you haven’t read about the Amazon vs Hachette (a Book Publisher) dispute, you should take a look at the Mark Coker’s post below.

It seems to me that the agency model of publishing is on it’s way out, but only time will tell what will replace it. We (authors, indie-publishers) do work in a ever-changing field, and that’s going to be the status quo for some time, I’m sure of it.

Smashwords: Amazon’s Hachette Dispute Foreshadows What’s Next for Indie Authors.

Free ISBN or No Free ISBN? That is the Question

from qwentanner.com

from qwentanner.com

I know I’ve posted information about ISBN’s before but Joel Friedlander on his website, The Book Designer, gives more detail than I’ve found in other blog posts before and is worth sharing if you’ve ever questioned whether you should accept that free ISBN from createspace or any other publisher. This post has information that should help you decide.

ISBN 101 For Self-Publishers — The Book Designer.

15 attributes of an effective query letter

from williampaid.com

from williampaid.com

If you want to go the traditional publishing route, you have to know how the write a dynamite query letter. The below link from Bookbaby and Chris Robley will give you some pointers.  I also would add mentioning your platform in your letter. That’s a big thing that agents and publishers are interested in – your followers, which equal your sales potential.

In addition, I would suggest you go the self-publishing route at the same time. This used to be a big no-no, but the list is growing every year of authors who self-published first and did so well that they attracted the attention of one of the big 5 (? – is that the correct number) publishers. And it a one way to build that platform that publishers like to see.

It also helps curb that itch to see your stuff in print (or on an ereader or both!) and frees up your energy to go onto your next masterpiece!

15 attributes of an effective query letter – BookBaby Blog.

What bookstores want….and why indie authors should learn to give it to them. Part II. |

from nonavarnado.com

from nonavarnado.com

This post by Randall Wood explains a lot when it comes to where to publish and why. And if he is correct ( haven’t read this any place else so I’m a wee-bit skeptical), he also explains why their additional distribution channels do little to actually sell more of your books. I don’t know where he got his figures from, but they are very interesting.

The only thing I would add is, I would print in one additional place – from a brick and mortar printer of your choice. Most do POD nowadays.

The reason?

Many Indie books stores do take self-published books (usually at a 40% discount) but since Createspace takes 50-55% anyway (I heard it was 50% if you published through createspace and 55% if you printed it yourself and you sell it on Amazon yourself), you’re way ahead in the profit category if the indie bookstore takes a book you had printed yourself.

What bookstores want….and why indie authors should learn to give it to them. Part II. |.

Types of Publishing – And you thought there were only two.

gutenbergpressHere is a post on Shewrites by Brooke Warner that lays out the various publishing options people have. I think it helps clear up some of the self-publishing confusion out there so I wanted to share it.

Keep in mind that places like createspace and ingram/lightening source are book printers (and distributors). You can also have a book printed at a brick and mortar printer near you. Most printers these days do print on demand (POD), meaning you can have one or one thousand books printed. The nice thing about brick and mortar printers is that the more you print (in one print run) the less it costs. I know for createspace, the printing cost is the same no matter how many books you have printed. I personally like to use brick and mortar printers because I like to see the books before they are sent out (to make sure the quality is what I want) and so I can sign the books and add a note asking for a review. I also like to work locally if I can – spread the love, so to speak. I may, as some point, also go with createspace but for now, I  put my books on Amazon myself.

Something to think about.

http://www.shewrites.com/profiles/blogs/new-era-of-publishing?inf_contact_key=66d8ad1f0f2711e2116bf3517d23010004ac39af63b49f6751a9963ae33914f6

Online Conference Around Self-publishing – IndieReCon

IRC_BlogHeaderIt is the second (and I would guess, annual) IndieReCon Feb 25 – 27, starting at 10 a.m. EST. If you are an self-published author or you’re looking to go that route, I would recommend tuning in – besides, it’s Free! Here is a description from their website:

What is it? IndieReCon is a FREE, ONLINE conference designed to help any writer or author who is curious about the ins and outs of Indie publishing. Are you curious about Indie publishing, but don’t know where to start?  Or are you already a published Indie author looking to boost your sales or expand your reach?

They have lots of good speakers (Berry Eisler, JA Konrath, Rachel Aaron, Chelsea Fine and Chelsea Cameron…) and giveaways including a Grandprize giveaway for your ebook submission. Here is the schedule if you want to check it out. And the link for the home page: http://www.indierecon.org/

Who knows, you might learn a thing or two!