Tag Archive | ebook sales

What Amazon’s Slowing of Book Deliveries Means For Authors 

The current, though admittedly, very abnormal situation illustrates how having your book as an ebook, as well as print, is a good idea.

Let’s be honest. No one ever HAD to have that book they ordered next day delivered. Frankly, even before this pandemic, I thought Amazon should give the Prime buyer the option of not shipping something next day. It would help all those overworked delivery services. And those who have the ability (car, health, money), once this thing is over, shouldn’t we be going to stores and buying our books if we can? You know, support your local bookstore, maybe even a local author!

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Amazon has announced via Seller Central that they will be slowing book delivery to prioritize medical and food delivery in the US and EU. What does that mean for authors and book sales during the COVID-19 crisis?

Source: What Amazon’s Slowing of Book Deliveries Means For Authors | Self-Publishing Review

B&N to Sell Self-Published Books In Stores – Sort Of

Interesting news from book business and Thad Mcilroy. I also know a print book author that got her book in a local (Wisconsin) B & N store, I think primarily because of a supportive store manager. She had to show the manager her book promotion plan and she let her do a reading and stock her book – Tween/YA fantasy fiction. For others, it might not be as easy going (per the article). Slowly, slowly, they are learning that self-published authors are an asset.

In its latest effort to reclaim lost territory from Amazon, Barnes & Noble will sell self-published books, in print, in its stores.

Source: B&N to Sell Self-Published Books In Stores

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Ebook vs Print Book Sales

pwc-eook-2018-prediction-500x406According to The New York Times:

In the United States and Britain, sales of e-books represent between a quarter and a third of the consumer book market and, by 2018, will edge out printed and audio books as the most lucrative segment, according to projections by the consulting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers.

As Nate Hoffelder of The Digital Reader points out though, the “perennial ebook optimists” at PricewaterhouseCoopers have now moved that goalpost back two years running. In 2012 they predicted that eBook sales would outpace print by 2016. In 2013, they said it’d happen in 2017. Now… it’s 2018.

One thing is certain, though: for many years to come, authors in the United Sates and Britian will need to make their books available in both print and digital editions in order to reach the most readers.

It’s also interesting to see how much less a share of the marketplace eBooks hold in many European countries. It’s exciting to see the growth opportunity for digital books in that region, but also a great chance for authors to continue selling print books to the millions of English-speakers in countries like Germany, Sweden, Norway, etc.

From Chris Robley of bookbaby

Who’s Afraid of Very Cheap Books?

Here is David Gaughran’s view on cheap ebook pricing.

I definitely think it has it’s place, whether you use it for a new book or keep your first book in your book series permanently on sale, I think those are fine marketing strategies. I would not, however, discount all of my books. I think it does give the impression that the story is not worth it. But then again, I don’t think selling a ebook for over $6 is reasonable, either. They do take money and time to make, of course, but sharing an electronic file is the least inexpensive way to share your stories and the price should reflect that.

Who’s Afraid of Very Cheap Books? | David Gaughran.